FOR GREGORY

Periodically I will add posts here if the sources provide additioanl informaiton on how to think about and deal with Dementia/ Alzheimer's Disease.

PLEASE NOTE:


SCROLL DOWN FOR TEXT and BIBLIOGRAPHY from DAI WEBINAR 2/22-23/2017. You can also find this information on my website: www.horvich.com


Even though this blog is now dormant (see info below) there are many useful, insightful posts. Scroll back from the end or forward from the beginning. My guess is that you could spend a lot of time here and maybe learn or experience a thing or two about living with and loving someone with Dementia/Alzheimer's or maybe come away with the feeling that "you are not alone" in YOUR work with the same!


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THIS WAS THE FINAL POST TO THIS SITE BEFORE IT WENT DORMANT.


Happy New Year 2016. With a new year comes new beginnings and sometimes endings. If I am personally progressing and if I am doing a good job in my grieving Gregory's death; if I have been able to learn my lessons in living and loving someone diagnosed with Dementia/ Alzheimer's; if I am to get on with my life ... I need to bring this Alzheimer's blog to an end since my writing has been dealing less with Dementia/ Alzheimer's and more with life after Dementia/ Alzheimer's.


Of course, I will always continue to work for and support fair treatment on behalf of people with Dementia/ Alzheimer's and may post here from time to time. Also, there are many wonderful posts here through which you may browse.


With this change, I will continue and reinvigorate my "michael a. horvich writes" blog which deals with grieving Gregory's death, life lessons, personal experiences, observations, memoirs, dreams, and humor in essay and poetry, as well as an attempt now and then at sharing a piece of fiction.


Please follow me there by clicking http://mhorvich.blogspot.com or click the link located on the right side of this page.


Finally, COMMENTS are always important to me and you can still comment on the posts on this blog! CLICK "Comments" and sign in or use "Anonymous." Leave your name or initials if you wish so I'll know it's you? Check the "Notify Me" box to see my reply to you.



Monday, November 2, 2015

Types of Dementia and More

Just read an interesting article about a variation of Dementia/ Alzheimer's in which the person affected had difficulties with vision. I saw a lot of this with Gregory as he progressed through his journey. Sometimes he could not see the fork sitting next to the plate in front of him. In the later stages of his Dementia, he had a difficult time focusing on things like the TV, a book of photographs, and at times on me!

As I have continued to study his "symptoms" it looks to me like he was affected by several types of dementia at one time including: Posterior Cortical Atrophy, Lewy Body, Frontotemporal, and  Primary Progressive Aphasia which affects language. 

A new type of Dementia is being called "Mixed Dementia." In mixed dementia abnormalities linked to more than one type of dementia occur simultaneously in the brain. Recent studies suggest that mixed dementia is more common than previously thought.

Recently, there has been a lot of activity and discussion in the following areas: 1) Types of Dementia, 2) Appropriate language to discuss Dementia and the people affected with it, 3) Including people with Dementia in decisions about caring for the needs of people with Dementia, and 4) A more careful use (if any) of psychotropic drugs with people diagnosed with Dementia.

As recently as ten years ago, not much was known about Dementia/ Alzheimer's. People were embarrassed to discuss the disease. Little was known about how to care for people with Dementia. While the knowledge base is increasing exponentially, much still needs to be done to understand the disease and to support people who have been diagnosed with one form or another of Dementia.

2 comments:

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